Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 2018

2006 Ford Mustang Retro Cruiser
July 1, 2016

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 2018

Ford Mustang_2018 Muscle CAR

The Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 "2018"

 

For the first time, a factory Mustang Shelby GT500 will have an independent rear suspension. The rest of the mega-Mustang is less groundbreaking: wider tracks, aerodynamic work, fatter tires. As with the previous GT500, this new model wears an enlarged grille with a big lower intake, and the combined visual effect is of gaping holes. Mostly, that maw—along with other various gashes and vents in the GT500’s bumper and hood—exists to route cool air to the brakes and engine. But it also looks mean as hell.

A big forced-induction V-8 will gulp air through them. Everyone is expecting a twin-turbocharged Coyote 5.0-liter V-8. That’s certainly a possibility but would surely sacrifice any pretense of efficiency in order to top the old GT500’s 662-hp supercharged 5.8-liter V-8 and the Camaro ZL1’s output, let alone mount a dark-horse effort to usurp the Challenger Hellcat’s horsepower rating.

Ford Mustang 2018

Gets new Styling, more Power and Technology. The 2018 Mustang sports a refreshed exterior design, with a lower, sleeker hood and squinty new LED headlights. Inside, buyers can now opt for a 12-inch-wide full digital instrument cluster to bring its retro-inspired cabin further into the 21st century. The Mustang’s entry-level V6 has been dropped in favor of a two-engine lineup that includes a torquier version of the current 2.3-liter turbocharged EcoBoost four-cylinder and a new 5.0-liter V8. The V8 features Ford’s “dual-fuel” port and direct fuel injection system -- already in use on several of its turbocharged motors – that helps it rev higher and produce more efficient power than the 5.0-liter it replaces, which is rated at 435 hp. An optional dual-mode exhaust system for the V8 will let you pump up the volume of all those ponies galloping out of the pipes.

The Mustang’s entry-level V6 has been dropped in favor of a two-engine lineup that includes a torquier version of the current 2.3-liter turbocharged EcoBoost four-cylinder and a new 5.0-liter V8. The V8 features Ford’s “dual-fuel” port and direct fuel injection system -- already in use on several of its turbocharged motors – that helps it rev higher and produce more efficient power than the 5.0-liter it replaces, which is rated at 435 hp. An optional dual-mode exhaust system for the V8 will let you pump up the volume of all those ponies galloping out of the pipes.

The mightiest Ford Mustang in the stable, the Shelby GT500, which will take aim at Chevrolet’s supercharged, 650-hp Camaro ZL1. Have we been down this road before? Absolutely—in 2013, well before the Mustang Shelby GT350 made its debut, we mistook a prototype of that car for Ford’s next Shelby GT500. This time around, the GT350 is on sale, leaving the GT500 as the only expected current-generation Mustang variant that is unrevealed. Furthermore, the test mule pictured here holds more specific clues to its claim to the GT500 throne.